Podcast | Spill The Tea | Episode 8 | Pricing

Spill The Tea | Episode 8 | Pricing

Spill the Tea – Episode 8 – Pricing

[Ming Johanson]

I often frame this for clients as well in terms of valuing your own time. If you value your own time at $280 an hour of your potential earning, what would you stop doing? Admin… it’d be admin for me.

[Kira Carlin]

And Kira never did laundry again.

[Intro]

What if you could learn from the mistakes of others? The Spill The Tea podcast is a great way to get information on all things related with digital marketing and business. Hosts myself, Ming Johanson and Kira Carlin break down our knowledge in various fields, including business, sales and marketing. So whether you’re new or old at doing any of these things, tune in each week and hear the lessons learnt, titbits of knowledge and talk of tea. 

[Ming Johanson]

Hi, Kira.

[Kira Carlin]

Hi Ming.

[Ming Johanson]

How are you?

[Kira Carlin]

Sniffly today? 

[Ming Johanson]

Yes.

Everyone is just going to just have to bear with my sniffling-ness.

[Ming Johanson]

Okay, it’s not COVID though?

[Kira Carlin]

No. God, no. No. It’s just the fact that my immune system hates me.

[Ming Johanson]

And you’ve decided to be allergic to my cats?

[Kira Carlin]

Yeah. I haven’t cuddled them in far too long because they’re triggering my immune responses. [Yes] Which is not ideal.

[Ming Johanson]

They are big cats. So I feel like the surface area of a cat per…

[Kira Carlin]

They’re also very fluffy cats.

[Ming Johanson]

They are very fluffy

[Kira Carlin]

It’s weird. The ones I’m allergic to and the ones I’m not.

[Ming Johanson]

Yes.

[Kira Carlin]

It’s like…

[Ming Johanson]

You have so many cats. [So many cats]. So it’s worth telling our listeners who don’t know Kira to know that she has many cats.

[Kira Carlin] 

So many cats!

[Ming Johanson]

And I think when you started, like she has a partner who also had cats when they started dating and then they got more cats.

[Kira Carlin] 

So many cats!

[Ming Johanson]

We’re at six cats?

[Kira Carlin]

Six cats, yes. Six is the sweet spot. Six is Perfect. It more or less ensures that you’ve got a cat on you at all times.

[Ming Johanson]

Except you have not got cats on you at any opportune time, that we are disgust. 

[Kira Carlin]

I know

[Ming Johanson]

So what tea are we drinking today?

[Kira Carlin]

Well, I’ve just got the good old T2 bog standard Melbourne Breakfast which I’m quite partial too.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah, It’s a good tea, it’s very reliable.

[Kira Carlin]

It is. Canberra breakfast isn’t bad either actually, of all the breakfasts.

[Ming Johanson]

I have a, what have I got? I’ve got an orange, peach and mango from a company called Majestea, which is from my local markets on the weekend.

[Kira Carlin]

Smells good. I can smell it from over here.

[Ming Johanson]

I said I would give her a shout out. So that’s a shout out and we’ll have a link to her website on that. This was not paid for. I did pay for my tea, so this is not a sponsored episode.

[Kira Carlin]

No, we just like talking about people who have good tea.

[Ming Johanson]

And giving it a good hard go, as well in business. 

[Kira Carlin]

Oh, it smells awesome. I can smell it from over here, it’s awesome.

[Ming Johanson]

And you can follow us on the TikTok. We have a Marketing Jumpstart TikTok. Go check that out. We have, we have videos of us drinking tea and judging the internet.

[Kira Carlin]

And you can see our cute cups.

[Ming Johanson]

We’re not going to tell you what’s on the cups, which will make you look at the TikToks.

[Kira Carlin]

Mainly because we’ll have to give ourselves an explicit tag if we do.

[Ming Johanson]

If that doesn’t bait people to go to our TikTok. [Laugh]

[Kira Carlin]

Exactly.

[Ming Johanson]

Honestly! [laugh] So what are we talking about today?

[Kira Carlin]

I think we should talk about pricing.

[Ming Johanson]

That’s a good topic.

[Kira Carlin]

We talk about pricing with so many clients. [Yeah] And it doesn’t feel like a necessarily a marketing remit, but it very definitely is.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah. Look, it comes up a lot for us and I think definitely in my own journey of pricing. It’s been an interesting ride. I think a lot of people really undervalue what it is that they’re delivering and you also spend a lot of time staring at your competitors, thinking that they’re all being successful. And you have no idea. You have no idea whether or not they’re succeeding at whatever price point they’re pitching.

[Kira Carlin]

Exactly. And often, by the time, it’s hard to understand what your competitors’ price points are, particularly in service businesses, because those things aren’t always directly advertised. [Yeah] So unless you’re going through the process, you don’t know what they’re charging [Yeah] but strangely enough, most of what we see isn’t people charging too much.

[Ming Johanson]

It’s usually the opposite.

[Kira Carlin]

It’s usually people charging too little, which then goes on to create a perception around the product.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah. So my question is usually, is your branding matching your price point? So if you have a brand that is exclusively higher, like a higher market tier and your pricing at Cadbury prices, are you creating a distrust for your product just on an unconscious level?

[Kira Carlin]

Mhm. And all of that perception stuff is really, really important. So on a not pricing or on a perception level, there was a really interesting piece of research I was fortunate enough to have presented to me at a conference, back when I was doing magazines. You know, when that was my thing. And she was an English researcher doing research on haptics in magazines. So her piece of research was she put different magazines on different topics in boxes and had people reach through a hole in the box, feel the paper stock. [Yeah] Feel the body of the thing and then tell her what they thought it was about.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah, right.

[Kira Carlin]

Because we have this perception of different things that make up something…

[Ming Johanson]

Tactile, that tactile feeling.

[Kira Carlin]

The tactile input that we get or the haptic input that we get that informs us. So a TV guide will be different from vogue? It will be different from a car magazine. [Yeah] And those things are so ingrained that we know what it’s about often before we even see the content.

[Ming Johanson]

I would say that, like so, the magazines that I tend to lean to are mindfulness ones. [exactly] So the Breathe magazine, right?

[Kira Carlin]

And they’ve got that beautiful heavy paper style.

[Ming Johanson]

Very specific.

[Kira Carlin]

Yeah, beautifully made. But they’re all the same for that reason, because they know that they’re tapping into something very tactile. [Yeah] It’s the same with pricing. We have biases that we don’t even realise we have because we’re looking for something wrong. If something is too cheap, we don’t automatically go, Oh, that’s a really great deal. We go, What is wrong with this object?

[Ming Johanson]

It was interesting. I was talking to some friends over Halloween and we were talking about candles and how much we would pay for a candle. And like some of the people in the room, including myself, would pay well up to like $100 for a candle that would literally last us 40 hours. And you know…but like the smell and the texture and the feeling of even just the jar that it’s in and that sort of lends back to packaging, which we’ll talk about in a different episode. But yet like that, that pricing perception to how you’re presenting your product as well.

[Kira Carlin]

Mhm. Exactly. So the client that we had kind of talked about this with sells a very particular art supply. Yeah. And he sells it at a very, very high quality. Yeah. But because he wants to, he doesn’t feel like he should sell it for a lot of money because he’s, you know, he’s at an early point in this business and I don’t feel like he quite feels it. He has the supply chains and the customer base built in. He sells it far cheaper than his competitors.

[Ming Johanson]

I feel like it’s a guilt.

[Kira Carlin]

I do too actually.

[Ming Johanson]

There’s a guilt like that idea that you’re taking advantage of people because you happen to find a supplier and you’re bringing all of this product over and you’re getting charged next to nothing for the product. But the problem that you’re actually solving, which ultimately is how his business started, was a supply chain. He has solved the problem around the supply chain that nobody else can be bothered doing. And that’s the information. But that’s the thing that you’re actually selling is the convenience.

[Kira Carlin]

And he uses that. He came from this from a crafters point of view that he wanted these things for his own craft practises. So he buys what he would want. [Yeah] He supplies what he would want to have bought back when he couldn’t buy it. [Yeah] It’s very high quality.

[Ming Johanson]

Yes.

[Kira Carlin]

It’s Gorgeous. And you’re looking for the other shoe to drop.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

You’re waiting to see what’s wrong with it.

[Ming Johanson]

So we ended up doing a digital marketing strategy document for him and as a part of that, we do a lot of research. And in the research we found that he was actually the cheapest. And when we presented that to him, he was like, ‘Well, why am I not selling out?’ And it’s like, because there is a price point for every single person.

And in fact you’re getting more problematic customers at the cheaper end because they’re squabbling over price or they’re squabbling over, you know, how much they get. Whereas people who are willing to pay a little bit more are paying for that quality, are paying for that brand.

[Kira Carlin]

And of course, craft is a crazy people and we just like to burn through money.

[Ming Johanson]

No I’m not. [sarcastic tone]

[Kira Carlin]

Oh yeah you are! We’re all terrible. We all have a set amount of money in our minds that we pay towards our crafts, and it’s always too much and it’s fine. [laugh] You know, I ship wool in from all over the place.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah, I legitimately just squealed about 20 minutes earlier because I just got a package full of resin, resin crafts stuff.

[Kira Carlin]

And keep an eye on our TikToks for that because there will be an unboxing video at some point. You can watch Ming lose her goddamn mind. [laugh] She is endlessly entertaining.

[Ming Johanson]

Which is interesting because it’s not a hobby I thought I would get into because I didn’t think I had the patience to wait for the resin to set. So it’s been an interesting learning experience because yeah, I’m super into resin crafts now. [laugh]

[Kira Carlin]

It’s amazing, isn’t it? You go through life thinking you’re not a very patient person and then you get into resin craft, or in my case, you buy a spinning wheel and you learn this incredibly, incredibly slow thing. [Yeah] And you’re like, Oh, so I have the patience for this, but not for anything else.

[Ming Johanson]

I don’t have the patience for people.

[Kira Carlin]

That’s it, that’s the kicker, isn’t it?

[Ming Johanson]

No, that’s not. That’s untrue. I do have patience for people. Drama, I don’t have patience for drama. That’s what I don’t have patience for.

[Kira Carlin]

I love other people’s dramas. I just don’t want to be involved in it personally. I want to be peering over the fence. [laugh]

[Ming Johanson]

So yeah. So when we’re talking about pricing, I have a starting point with most of our clients when I’m having this conversation with them, which is whatever you think your product is worth or service is worth, double it and then add 30%. Just as a starting point because whatever you think it is, it’s worth double whatever you think it is.

[Kira Carlin]

I think that’s pretty fair.

[Ming Johanson]

And that has been a pretty consistently led experiment for most of our clients.

[Kira Carlin]

And then you do that and you get rid of that whole bunch of penny counters right at the bottom. [Yeah] Who nags for discounts and for all the things when you’re already priced as low as you can go. [Yeah] You get rid of this whole section who have gone off to bother somebody else. [Yeah] And start looking at people who are actually looking for quality products and services.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah, absolutely. And then, you know, you, then you start to look at Will, how can I package this differently? How can I bundle things together? How can I value add? And the suggestion has always been don’t discount value add. [Hmm] How can you add value to your customers’ experience? What else can you provide them? Instead of discounting, you price it down, because there’s this mentality that if you discount it, then people will value it more and that’s actually quite the opposite. Psychologically, you’re training them that you’re not valuing your own product.

[Kira Carlin]

Mhm That’s pretty fair. Also the fact that once you discount people start to get into a mindset of Oh well you were just padding it anyway, this is what it really costs.

[Ming Johanson]

That’s probably the worst thing to run on socials, is to follow our Facebook page or follow our Instagram for discounts. [Mhm] Because that’s all you’re attracting to your socials then is people who are after a discount. They’re not there because they value your brand or whatever it is that you’re doing. They’re devaluing your brand and asking for a discount or watching out for when you’ve got a sale.

[Kira Carlin]

Essentially, you’re training seagulls as well. [Laugh] You’re training people to look for the opportunity rather than to come to you for the thing you genuinely offer. [Yeah] You’ve just got this whole bunch of little like your followers are just going [seagull sound].

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah. When you’re undervaluing the customers who actually paid you full price.

[Kira Carlin]

Exactly. It’s the discount thing. I know it’s a popular, a populist system, but it’s just not. I haven’t seen it work that often for our clients in the way that they want it to.

[Ming Johanson]

So a really good book that I talk about a lot and I do not stop talking about it and I will not stop talking about it because it was such a massive game changer for me is a book called ‘Profit First’ by a guy named Mike McDowell. It’s a bit of a mouthful. We will link to it.

It is a book that really started to shift the way that I thought about money and operating a business and having different buckets, essentially, which I know Barefoot Investor talks about as well. You kind of start to think about, okay, well what are the things I have to pay for my business? So for me, I have employees, I have taxes. Yay! [laugh]

Thank you, Marvin, my accountant from liquid tax. You are forever in my corner. So they’re operating expenses, so we have lots of licences to lots of software and when you start to calculate all of that out, you realise that you are under charging your services, you know, especially if you have a bricks and mortar store, then you’re also paying for rent and electricity and ingredients and resources.

So costing everything out and then not changing your prices for, I don’t know, 20 years when the price of literally everything has jumped like, you know, just the cost of living has increased by about 10 percent right? [just in the last few years] So the cost of living has increased in the last six months. So, you know that being scared of adjusting prices and then losing customers, you might want to lose those customers.

[Kira Carlin]

Because once you do that, you have a room to actually work with the ones you have. You improve your customer service. It all kind of, [yeah] If you spend all of your time dealing with the bottom 10%, you really don’t want to be dealing with any way because they’re a giant pain. [Yeah] You don’t have room for that other 90%.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah. And there is literally a market for every price. There really is. It doesn’t matter what price you actually, In fact, I ran an experiment for a while early on in my business where every time I talked to a new customer, I would increase my prices by $1,000. [laugh] So each new lead and it and it like when I stopped converting was where my price would typically land.

So when I stopped converting customers, that would be when my price would land. And I’d have to be able to go into that conversation confident in saying what that price was. And until we landed on the prices that we have now, and that’s been pretty much stayed the same for the last couple of years. But yeah, the reality is I was testing because I originally didn’t have confidence and value in myself.

[Kira Carlin]

That’s pretty fair. And I think that’s true of a lot of people who run businesses, particularly small businesses and reasonably new businesses. They don’t have confidence that what they’re doing is working or valuable or valid. And you see it in that very early start up stage and you’ve worked a lot in the start up community of that real confidence going in like this is going to be great and then falling off a little bit.

[Ming Johanson]

Some of that is also because you haven’t got a valid idea, right? [Yeah] So you spend your time spinning your wheels, trying to convince people that you’ve got this really great product that everybody wants, and then you start discounting your price. And the reality is, is if nobody’s willing to pay you for your product, you don’t have a valid business.

Originally we were a tech training company, right? So I started my business as a business teaching people how to use their iPhones because they kept coming into my Telstra store at the time to learn how to use their iPhones and my that valid false validation was people were looking for this but they weren’t, they were going back to a Telstra store to go and talk to the person that sold them the phone in the first place.

So like the first six months of my business, If I could have done a startup weekend then, that would have been the best decision I’d ever made because it would have compressed the six months that I spent spinning my wheels in the first six months of my business into three days. Everybody should just go to do a startup weekend, I don’t care where you are in your business. Everybody just should do that just to learn and relearn some of the valuable lessons that you can get out of that.

[Kira Carlin]

I think that’s pretty fair. I think the other thing that happens a lot in particularly new businesses is that people don’t understand the pricing structures in their industry, particularly if you’re entering a new industry which you know, if you’ve been around the traps for a while, you’ve got an idea of how things work. But at the beginning it’s one thing to say, okay, well this is what it’s going to cost me to do this and therefore I’m going to charge this.

[Yeah] It often backfires on you that way because you, at some, at certain points don’t understand what it costs. Even if you’ve worked in that industry and other capacities for a while, they’re going to be costs that you didn’t see coming.

[Ming Johanson]

There’s so many invisible costs of running a business, so many.

[Kira Carlin]

So the one that comes off the top of my head and I used to be a photographer and or I used to occasionally do second shooter jobs for weddings and things. I loathe shooting weddings. I would never do it as a job myself or as a primary.

[Ming Johanson]

I’ve done it a couple of times as a second shooter.

[Kira Carlin]

Yes, I hate shooting weddings, but of course, as a second shooter, I show up and do my job. I think I know how a wedding…

[Ming Johanson]

Yes.

[Kira Carlin]

Works. [Yeah] I’m not the one who’s dealing with…

[Ming Johanson]

Who’s directing?

[Kira Carlin]

liaising clients, doing all those things. So if I was going into that business, there would be a whole learning curve there. But also the thing you’ve got to understand is the way that the perception comes across. If I was looking for a wedding photographer and I’m getting quoted $3,000, 3500, you know, all these numbers and then someone quotes me at 800 bucks.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

What am I thinking about? That person?

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

They don’t understand the industry.

[Ming Johanson]

They don’t know what they’re doing.

[Kira Carlin]

They’re not very good. [Yeah] they’re very, very new.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah. And I’ll be honest, I had that mentality very early on in my business. I would get outraged that people would charge 3000 to $20000 for a website. And what’s hysterical is obviously we charged that now. [Yeah] Because we are way more seasoned than I was 12 years ago. And I know, like my team have this conversation with me internally quite often, is that I was so painfully adamant that I was never going to do websites. I was. [How did that go?]  Yeah, well, obviously that’s not happening, right? Like and incidentally, we’ve ended up doing websites because out of necessity we can’t do our marketing piece if the website isn’t functional to the standard that we need it to be to track things.

[Kira Carlin]

And working with industry partners on that can be great, but it’s hard finding industry partners that have the bandwidth outside of their own stuff to do it, are good and do things in a timely manner. All those things that… so it became easier just to do it ourselves. And the thing that.

[Ming Johanson]

Now we have a Vern.

[Kira Carlin]

Oh, having a Vern is just so wonderful.

[Ming Johanson]

And a Derek, we have a Vern & a Derek

[Kira Carlin]

But so what happens with the website thing is it would be so easy to want to under quote a website to go, okay, well this is how much time it’s going to take and okay, this is what it’s going to cost. You know, this is how you end up with things like a $700 website and we say it all the time is we fix $700 websites because however often you use, however long you think it’s going to take to build a website, you triple that.

[Ming Johanson]

Well and a lot of it is getting eliciting stuff back from the client.

[Kira Carlin]

Exactly once you’ve got the comms factored in and the ‘oh my God’, it’s wrong. But I can’t figure out what’s going wrong because nothing should be wrong here time and then the ‘oh I liked this three weeks ago but now I don’t’. [Yeah] you’ve got a lot of back and forth that needs to happen when you factor that in.

[Ming Johanson]

I spoke to my cousin and my cousin.

[Kira Carlin]

Urgh, Death by committee.

[Ming Johanson]

And you know, a lot of that would be solved by having a brand and style guide right? [Exactly] So if you have a brand and style guide and you give that to your web designer and the web designer goes, Oh, cool. Okay, well, I’ll work within those parameters and build you a website. It’s a lot easier and a lot smoother, and then it’s, you know, there’s a…So we have processes that we’ve built over the years because of everything we do in marketing around language, right? And then that language also feeds back into pricing.

[Kira Carlin]

It’s part of the language really.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah. So if you say you are exclusive, if you say you are handcrafted, that immediately has more value than if you’re saying you are quick.

[Kira Carlin]

Exactly. And it depends on what you’re making or selling or obviously. But there’s a reason why people charge more for those things is because they value their time. And that time gets folded into the cost. [Yeah] And without that you’re going, okay, well why don’t you value your time? [Yeah] Are you not very good? [Yeah] What am I going to end up with here?

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah. So there was a really great poster that I used to see all the time, which was you can have quick, cheap or good and you can only have two at any one time. You can’t have all three. You have to pick two. [Mm] So you know you’re, you’re sacrificing good if you pick quick and cheap. [Mm]

[Kira Carlin]

And quick and cheap has its place. [Absolutely] You know there have been moments in my life where I just needed to put a quick, cheap solution together for something that you then plan to replace with something.

[Ming Johanson]

I had told people that. Like especially when we were like we have conversations with business owners all the time and sometimes they just go, Oh, look, we really need this, but we don’t have the budget. Okay, well, here are three places that you can get this at a more affordable price or at a cheaper price. It’s not going to be perfect.

It’s not going to be the thing that you want 100%, but it’s a starting point and it’ll get you across the line. [Exactly] And sometimes that’s all you need. If it gets you across the line, great. Okay, let’s start there then. Then let’s build you up to get the better, shinier thing later on. I have spent. Yeah, anywhere from, what is it, $100 to $3,500 for branding.

Yeah. When we spoke about that in the previous episode where you know the difference between having a $100 logo versus a $3,500 logo is very different. And the messaging and the language and who we’re focussing on and who we actually want to talk to. You know, the difference in the development of those two things are hugely, hugely different as well.

[Kira Carlin]

Mhm, And it will always be that way. There will always be a cost for quality and most people have come to accept that over the course of their lives. And that’s why they look for that price point that matches what they believe it should be costing.

[Ming Johanson]

I often frame this for clients as well in terms of valuing your own time. If you value your own time at $280 an hour of your potential earning, what would you stop doing? Admin… it’d be admin for me. [laugh]

[Kira Carlin]

And Kira never did laundry again. [laugh[ But to the same point though, I think it’s worth noting that if you’re charging for quality, the product or service that you’re delivering has to be quality.

[Ming Johanson]

Yes.

[Kira Carlin]

And it also has to be solving a real problem for people. So recently I went and spoke to a door company.

Ming Johanson

Yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

Oh, that door company. I needed some wardrobe doors. I was out of ideas. I haven’t really installed doors before, so I went to see if there were things I needed to know about that.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

And I was quoted $2,200. [Yeah] And an eight week wait. Time to install my wardrobe doors.

[Ming Johanson]

That you already had. You already had the doors?

[Kira Carlin]

I didn’t have them but what I wanted wasn’t particularly outlandish. [Yeah] So of course I then left and went to the Bunnings 300 metres down the road and costed the whole thing out for $300.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

And we’re doing it like tonight. [Yeah]. We’re, we’re doing the whole thing. It’ll take us a couple of hours.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

So if you’re quoting in the thousands for something that I can buy for 300 bucks and do myself.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah, but again, there’s got to…

[Kira Carlin]

You gotta be making sure that what you’re offering is really worth it.

[Ming Johanson]

But again, there’s a market for that, right?

[Kira Carlin]

Absolutely. People who can’t DIY.

[Ming Johanson]

Oh, people who don’t want to. There’s a market there for people who are just like, nope, I am nope-ing my way out of that and I’m paying somebody else to do that because whatever, fatigue, I don’t have time, don’t have resources, don’t have but I’ve got money, right? So, yeah, I guess, you know, proving the point that there is a market out there obviously because it’s still in business, right?

[Kira Carlin]

Yeah, they’re still in business. The thing that blows my mind, though, is that it’s the convenience you’re paying for because the product is actually better at the big box store down the road, which is terrible.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

Like they should be for the price point, offering something.

[Ming Johanson]

Better.

[Kira Carlin]

Much better.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah, yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

And you know what, if it had been a craftsperson, if it had been something better than I could buy it at Bunnings, I wouldn’t have battered an eye. 

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah like if it was, if it was somebody that you know had the words bespoke.

[Kira Carlin]

Which is a whole linguistic thing that I will rant at you at a later time, that particular word just grinds my gears.

[Ming Johanson]

But it’s, but it’s, you know, like that wood carver, you know, generational wood carver. If it was a generational woodcarver who made boats over the weekend, you know, woodcarving.

[Kira Carlin]

Not an issue, if I’m getting a solid timber door.

[Ming Johanson]

Door, yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

That you know, will last me the rest of my life. [Yeah] I’m not saying a damn word. It’s just take my money.

[Ming Johanson]

Yeah.

[Kira Carlin]

But for the same MDF crap that I can buy for ten bucks. [Oh yeah] $48 down the road. [Yes] And still have to paint myself even if they install it for me by the way.

[Ming Johanson]

I can tell you’re frustrated about this.

[Kira Carlin]

I’m still mad. This happened like two weeks ago and I haven’t even recovered yet. I’m still not done. My partner still sometimes just sits up out of nowhere, like in the middle of the night and goes $2,200. [laugh]

[Ming Johanson]

That’s one of those ‘tell them you’re dreaming moments’.

[Kira Carlin]

I literally said that as I was walking out the door, I’m pretty sure it was loud enough for them to hear. They were very rude to us. [laugh]

[Ming Johanson]

So if you want to find out more or have a conversation with us about pricing, you can connect with us on LinkedIn. My name is Ming Johanson.

[Kira Carlin]

My name is Kira Carlin. I will also throw in that rant about the word bespoke. If you really want. [Go on] Find me on LinkedIn for the rant.

[Ming Johanson]

You can do the rant on Linkedin.

[Kira Carlin]

You can find me on LinkedIn for the rant. I will happily provide that to anybody who’s interested.

[Ming Johanson]

You can check out the website Marketingjumpstart.com.au We have the episodes go up weekly on our website, also with a transcript and links to tea and other things.

[Kira Carlin]

All of the things.

[Ming Johanson]

All of the things.

Liked this article? Share it!
LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email
About Michael
Transitioning from industries like hospitality, hotels, retail, and media into the realm of digital marketing was initially daunting. Yet, I quickly discovered that my diverse background held immense value in this dynamic field. Working in digital marketing has not only provided me with opportunities for growth and innovation but has also become a canvas for expressing my creativity. Beyond work, I’m known for my outgoing personality and passions for the Korean culture, music, movies, and games. And, just a heads up, I’m not one to enjoy pineapples on pizza—sorry, pineapple lovers!